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Swimming is HARD
Wed Aug 04, 2004 7:34 am martidj
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Last night did one of the hardest swimming sessions in a while. The guys I was working with are the same speed so we all suffered. The detail :

600 m
500 m
400 m
300 m
200 m
100m x3

But that doesn't show just how hard it was. Even the 600m we were doing 1:25 per 100 and the 200m was 2:45, the 100's on 1:15. Legs started to cramp towards the end, a sure sign I was working.

A good session, in a masochistic sort of way.
_________________
What are these machines for ?
- Sir, I know not what these machines will be used for, but I do know you will tax them !

(Inventor of the electric motor Sir Michael Faraday to Chancellor Gladstone)

On the recovery road
Mon Aug 02, 2004 8:06 am martidj
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It's soooooo frustrating when everyone else is busily doing PB's and I'm stuck injured. Then again, I'm whingeing. Sort it, Daniel. There are people in a much worse condition than you !

Right shoulder is on the mend after my sister diagnosed a scapula muscle strain, which she said would be quite painful to treat (she found the right pressure points and wasn't joking) but although it's sore, it's finally getting better.

Right calf is also looking good, did a half hour run this morning. Not as strong as it should be but at least I can do some running now. On the bike tonight around Oxford and I'll try a little trot after that.
_________________
What are these machines for ?
- Sir, I know not what these machines will be used for, but I do know you will tax them !

(Inventor of the electric motor Sir Michael Faraday to Chancellor Gladstone)

Greatest engineering heroes
Wed Jul 28, 2004 3:10 pm martidj
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For those puzzling over my post on inspirational people, here's the detail.

John Harrison
Invention of the ship’s chronometer, it took him 50 years, against many setbacks and much scepticism. In the end he had to get Parliament to vote him the money the Board of Longitude refused to award. It made accurate navigation at sea possible.

Sir Daniel Gooch
Locomotive Superintendent of the early Great Western Railway. Appointed at age 21 at a salary of 2000 per year. His ‘Firefly’ design reached 70 mph on test in 1848. He later served as MP for Swindon and then GWR General Manager.

Sir Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Chief engineer of the Great Western Railway. No list would be complete without this man. His crystal clear and accurate vision of the future was his most important ability. The exchange below is typical :

GWR director #1 The line is too long.
IKB No – it’s far too short. We should extend it to New York by building a steamship.
GWR director #2 He’ll have us going to the moon next.


Sir Michael Faraday
The bookbinder’s apprentice who impressed Sir Humphrey Davy with his lecture notes. Invented the electric motor, defined electrical theory, made modern electrical systems possible. Like the other pioneers (Volta, Ohm, Tesla, Ampere, Joule) he has a unit of measurement (the Farad) named after him.

Marie Curie
Discovered Radium with husband Pierre after many years solitary work, unrecognised and broke – then won Nobel prizes for Physics in 1904 and Chemistry in 1911.

Admiral Hyman Rickover
Project managed the conversion of the nuclear reactor in 5 years from laboratory curiosity to USS Nautilus in 1954. All the design innovations and systems he created are still in use on modern submarines.

Albert Speer
Appointed Hitler’s deputy at age 29, placed in charge of all German armaments production and managed to increase production levels whilst factories were being flattened. Luckily for all of us, he came on the scene too late in 1943– or the Germans would have won. He apologised at the 1946 Nuremberg war trials for Nazi atrocities (he was guilty of active connivance – at the very least) and was rewarded with his life.

Verner Von Braun
Chief engineer, German V2 rocket, later American Apollo program. He was a war criminal but the Americans turned a blind eye (the Paperclip Conspiracy) so that his team could develop the technology that would lead to the Saturn V rocket within 20 years.

Sir Charles Parsons
Inventor of the steam turbine. Ignored until he took his experimental ship Turbinia illegally to the Naval Review at Spithead, 1897. No one could catch him as he went past at 34 knots in front of Queen Victoria. Coupled to an AC generator set (courtesy of Tesla), the steam turbine also made large scale electrical power usage possible.
_________________
What are these machines for ?
- Sir, I know not what these machines will be used for, but I do know you will tax them !

(Inventor of the electric motor Sir Michael Faraday to Chancellor Gladstone)

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