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Britain's Greatest Explorer - A triathlete?
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Cobbie




Joined: 02 Aug 2005
Posts: 7447
Location: Chester

PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2018 7:30 pm    Post subject: Re: Britain's Greatest Explorer - A triathlete? Reply with quote

explorerJC wrote:
Cobbie wrote:
explorerJC wrote:
Cobbie wrote:
explorerJC wrote:

i am not sure how trying to climb an unclimbed ridge is not considered exploration for Bonno...not sure also how Fiennes doesn't make with transglobe and the northwest passage...but i am with you with Thesiger..i also like gentleman explorers like Eric Newby...

Well, I guess it's all semantics really - for me mountaineering and exploration are different things entirely, though you could argue that Bonnington's highly logistical approach mirrored that of most Victorian explorers.
As for Fiennes, he wasn't the first to do any of the things he 'explored' which doesn't detract (for me at least) from the achievement but again, was he really exploring? I would say not.

Somewhere, you have to draw a line to distinguish between categories, mine are a bit tighter than yours on this point, probably weaker on others
I'm being harsher on Wally Herbert than anyone else in my list.

Newby was clearly a traveller and a great writer - I am a real admirer of his but he was an early adopter to use modern parlance Smile


then surely you have to exclude Cook and Raleigh etc...

Confused
Cook 'discovered' (maybe mapped would be a better word) more of the earth's surface than anybody else


which bits did he get to before anyone else?

By that logic there are no explorers Smile

Before anyone else - Antarctica
Before any other European - east coast of Australia; more or less all of NZ (apart from the very northern tip), Hawaii, west coast of the USA, Canada, Alaska; first into both Arctic and Antarctic ... that's off the top of my head Smile
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explorerJC




Joined: 20 Oct 2005
Posts: 15757
Location: Farthingstone

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 7:16 am    Post subject: Re: Britain's Greatest Explorer - A triathlete? Reply with quote

Cobbie wrote:
explorerJC wrote:
Cobbie wrote:
explorerJC wrote:
Cobbie wrote:
explorerJC wrote:

i am not sure how trying to climb an unclimbed ridge is not considered exploration for Bonno...not sure also how Fiennes doesn't make with transglobe and the northwest passage...but i am with you with Thesiger..i also like gentleman explorers like Eric Newby...

Well, I guess it's all semantics really - for me mountaineering and exploration are different things entirely, though you could argue that Bonnington's highly logistical approach mirrored that of most Victorian explorers.
As for Fiennes, he wasn't the first to do any of the things he 'explored' which doesn't detract (for me at least) from the achievement but again, was he really exploring? I would say not.

Somewhere, you have to draw a line to distinguish between categories, mine are a bit tighter than yours on this point, probably weaker on others
I'm being harsher on Wally Herbert than anyone else in my list.

Newby was clearly a traveller and a great writer - I am a real admirer of his but he was an early adopter to use modern parlance Smile


then surely you have to exclude Cook and Raleigh etc...

Confused
Cook 'discovered' (maybe mapped would be a better word) more of the earth's surface than anybody else


which bits did he get to before anyone else?

By that logic there are no explorers Smile

Before anyone else - Antarctica
Before any other European - east coast of Australia; more or less all of NZ (apart from the very northern tip), Hawaii, west coast of the USA, Canada, Alaska; first into both Arctic and Antarctic ... that's off the top of my head Smile


Cook didn't even sight antarctica and was beaten to the remainder by what became the indigenous populations amongst others....being first european doesn't really count....
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Cobbie




Joined: 02 Aug 2005
Posts: 7447
Location: Chester

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 9:30 am    Post subject: Re: Britain's Greatest Explorer - A triathlete? Reply with quote

explorerJC wrote:
Cobbie wrote:
explorerJC wrote:
Cobbie wrote:
explorerJC wrote:
Cobbie wrote:
explorerJC wrote:

i am not sure how trying to climb an unclimbed ridge is not considered exploration for Bonno...not sure also how Fiennes doesn't make with transglobe and the northwest passage...but i am with you with Thesiger..i also like gentleman explorers like Eric Newby...

Well, I guess it's all semantics really - for me mountaineering and exploration are different things entirely, though you could argue that Bonnington's highly logistical approach mirrored that of most Victorian explorers.
As for Fiennes, he wasn't the first to do any of the things he 'explored' which doesn't detract (for me at least) from the achievement but again, was he really exploring? I would say not.

Somewhere, you have to draw a line to distinguish between categories, mine are a bit tighter than yours on this point, probably weaker on others
I'm being harsher on Wally Herbert than anyone else in my list.

Newby was clearly a traveller and a great writer - I am a real admirer of his but he was an early adopter to use modern parlance Smile


then surely you have to exclude Cook and Raleigh etc...

Confused
Cook 'discovered' (maybe mapped would be a better word) more of the earth's surface than anybody else


which bits did he get to before anyone else?

By that logic there are no explorers Smile

Before anyone else - Antarctica
Before any other European - east coast of Australia; more or less all of NZ (apart from the very northern tip), Hawaii, west coast of the USA, Canada, Alaska; first into both Arctic and Antarctic ... that's off the top of my head Smile


Cook didn't even sight antarctica and was beaten to the remainder by what became the indigenous populations amongst others....being first european doesn't really count....

I used the word semantics in my first post, I'll leave it at that Smile
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explorerJC




Joined: 20 Oct 2005
Posts: 15757
Location: Farthingstone

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 9:47 am    Post subject: Re: Britain's Greatest Explorer - A triathlete? Reply with quote

Cobbie wrote:
explorerJC wrote:
Cobbie wrote:
explorerJC wrote:
Cobbie wrote:
explorerJC wrote:
Cobbie wrote:
explorerJC wrote:

i am not sure how trying to climb an unclimbed ridge is not considered exploration for Bonno...not sure also how Fiennes doesn't make with transglobe and the northwest passage...but i am with you with Thesiger..i also like gentleman explorers like Eric Newby...

Well, I guess it's all semantics really - for me mountaineering and exploration are different things entirely, though you could argue that Bonnington's highly logistical approach mirrored that of most Victorian explorers.
As for Fiennes, he wasn't the first to do any of the things he 'explored' which doesn't detract (for me at least) from the achievement but again, was he really exploring? I would say not.

Somewhere, you have to draw a line to distinguish between categories, mine are a bit tighter than yours on this point, probably weaker on others
I'm being harsher on Wally Herbert than anyone else in my list.

Newby was clearly a traveller and a great writer - I am a real admirer of his but he was an early adopter to use modern parlance Smile


then surely you have to exclude Cook and Raleigh etc...

Confused
Cook 'discovered' (maybe mapped would be a better word) more of the earth's surface than anybody else


which bits did he get to before anyone else?

By that logic there are no explorers Smile

Before anyone else - Antarctica
Before any other European - east coast of Australia; more or less all of NZ (apart from the very northern tip), Hawaii, west coast of the USA, Canada, Alaska; first into both Arctic and Antarctic ... that's off the top of my head Smile


Cook didn't even sight antarctica and was beaten to the remainder by what became the indigenous populations amongst others....being first european doesn't really count....

I used the word semantics in my first post, I'll leave it at that Smile


Smile
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