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Calories spent in training

 
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Chrace




Joined: 28 Apr 2010
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Location: Eating a Yorkie

PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 4:07 pm    Post subject: Calories spent in training Reply with quote

So, here I was thinking I was using loads of calories by training.

Then I took the unfortunate time to google "240 watt hour in calories" following a turbo session. Which equates to a massive 206 (K)calories.

My Garmin keeps saying an hour of running is 1000 calories for me, and my rowing machine has in-built calorie counter which says I can burn 1000 calories in 20 minutes when hitting it hard. Neither of these felt anywhere 5 times as hard as an hour on the turbo.

Garmin got it wrong, sure I can get that, but why does the rower over-estimate so massively on something it can surely estimate fairly precisely?

Also, anyone know roughly how swim/bike/run aligns to each other in a very vague and rough average? Say "an hour of biking is 50% spent compared with an hour of running" (for equal PE) or something.
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Last edited by Chrace on Wed Jan 09, 2019 4:27 pm; edited 1 time in total
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jibberjim




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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 4:17 pm    Post subject: Re: Calories spent in training Reply with quote

Chrace wrote:
Garmin got it wrong, sure I can get that, but why does the rower over-estimate so massively on something it can surely estimate fairly precisely?


No, garmin was measuring output you may have produced 240watts for your hour, but of course you are not a 100% efficient machine, you got hot I imagine... typical cycling efficiency for a human is a bit over 20%, so yes right around that 1000 you estimated.

Running is of course harder to estimate, because efficiency in running is so much more variable than in cycling (stride length, how much braking, how elastic etc. all vary it more) so it's harder to go from output metric like the watts there, hence it relying more on an HR estimate which is measuring calories burnt.
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Chrace




Joined: 28 Apr 2010
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 4:30 pm    Post subject: Re: Calories spent in training Reply with quote

jibberjim wrote:
Chrace wrote:
Garmin got it wrong, sure I can get that, but why does the rower over-estimate so massively on something it can surely estimate fairly precisely?


No, garmin was measuring output you may have produced 240watts for your hour, but of course you are not a 100% efficient machine, you got hot I imagine... typical cycling efficiency for a human is a bit over 20%, so yes right around that 1000 you estimated.

I had no idea we were that inefficient!

In that case they're probably not far off each other. The rower is still massively out if it's showing effective output but if it's estimating my burn then perhaps less off the mark.

Thanks!
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explorerJC




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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:22 pm    Post subject: Re: Calories spent in training Reply with quote

jibberjim wrote:
Chrace wrote:
Garmin got it wrong, sure I can get that, but why does the rower over-estimate so massively on something it can surely estimate fairly precisely?


. typical cycling efficiency for a human is a bit over 20%, s.


any idea what it is for a fish?
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stenard




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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This might help: https://blog.trainerroad.com/calories-and-power/
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Chrace




Joined: 28 Apr 2010
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

stenard wrote:
This might help: https://blog.trainerroad.com/calories-and-power/

Thanks stenard. That's plenty precise for me and avoids knowing fish mechanics.
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JaRok2300




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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

On a slightly related note I've noticed that Garmin (in conjunction with My Fitness Pal) gives me the calories credit for a run but also the number of steps whilst running which feels like double counting.

Does anyone know if this is correct & taken into account or whether there is some way of disabling this?
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iwaters




Joined: 06 Sep 2016
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Surprised the rower is so out as presumably if it s a Concept2 it has a power meter. The more accurate something measures your output the more accurate the algorithms are when calculating the calories by factoring the inefficiency.

Usually PM > HRM > Nothing.
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tuckandgo




Joined: 03 Sep 2012
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:27 am    Post subject: Re: Calories spent in training Reply with quote

Chrace wrote:
So, here I was thinking I was using loads of calories by training.

Then I took the unfortunate time to google "240 watt hour in calories" following a turbo session. Which equates to a massive 206 (K)calories.

My Garmin keeps saying an hour of running is 1000 calories for me, and my rowing machine has in-built calorie counter which says I can burn 1000 calories in 20 minutes when hitting it hard. Neither of these felt anywhere 5 times as hard as an hour on the turbo.

Garmin got it wrong, sure I can get that, but why does the rower over-estimate so massively on something it can surely estimate fairly precisely?

Also, anyone know roughly how swim/bike/run aligns to each other in a very vague and rough average? Say "an hour of biking is 50% spent compared with an hour of running" (for equal PE) or something.


Good rule of thumb for running is 100 calories a mile. (burn few for a longer time or more in a shorter time over the same distance and so forth)
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Whisk




Joined: 09 Jun 2005
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2019 12:49 pm    Post subject: Re: Calories spent in training Reply with quote

Chrace wrote:
So, here I was thinking I was using loads of calories by training.

Then I took the unfortunate time to google "240 watt hour in calories" following a turbo session. Which equates to a massive 206 (K)calories.

My Garmin keeps saying an hour of running is 1000 calories for me, and my rowing machine has in-built calorie counter which says I can burn 1000 calories in 20 minutes when hitting it hard. Neither of these felt anywhere 5 times as hard as an hour on the turbo.

Garmin got it wrong, sure I can get that, but why does the rower over-estimate so massively on something it can surely estimate fairly precisely?

Also, anyone know roughly how swim/bike/run aligns to each other in a very vague and rough average? Say "an hour of biking is 50% spent compared with an hour of running" (for equal PE) or something.


There's no way that you're burning 3x as many calories on the rowing machine as you are when you're running. If you think about it from a physiological point of view, you're breathing in oxygen and using it to burn carbs and fat, so the calorie burn must be proportional to your % of VO2max and your body weight.
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Chrace




Joined: 28 Apr 2010
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2019 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

iwaters wrote:
Surprised the rower is so out as presumably if it s a Concept2 it has a power meter. The more accurate something measures your output the more accurate the algorithms are when calculating the calories by factoring the inefficiency.

Usually PM > HRM > Nothing.

It's an older Kettler Axos so defo not PM based. Might play around with resistance settings and see how that affects it - it at all.

Concept 2 is just far too expensive for how much I use it. Smile
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Jorgan




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PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2019 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's simple. If you're putting on weight, you're over-fuelling. If you're losing weight, you're under-fuelling, and if you're stable, you've got it about right. This assumes your BMI is in the green zone.

Next question? Wink
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