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What does broiled mean
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rocks




Joined: 02 Sep 2004
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 2:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would thoroughly recommend reading "Kitchen Confidential" by Anthony Bourdin... a highly entertaining and informative book about working behind the scenes in the restaurant business. He talks alot about "working the broiler station", which is clearly considered to be first amongst equals in your average US restaurant kitchen.
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vics55




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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I would thoroughly recommend reading "Kitchen Confidential" by Anthony Bourdin... a highly entertaining and informative book about working behind the scenes in the restaurant business. He talks alot about "working the broiler station", which is clearly considered to be first amongst equals in your average US restaurant kitchen.


seconded. and a very true account of what goes on in kitchens.
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tritraveller




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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Badger wrote:

Broiling is top-down heat - UK grilling.
Grilling is cooking both sides, kinda like how a panini is heated. Whoppers are advertised as "flame-grilled" - so that's cooked over a flame on a rack. (?) Or it can mean barbequeing.
Steamed is steamed, as far as I know.


Right on the money. Most ovens come with a broiler. Mine has a grill fitted to the top of the oven, as well as conventional oven cooking you can put on the broiler, put a shelf near the top of the oven and put something on it that you want to be cooked and browned quickly. Lobster tails are a great example...

Ovens here(generally) don't have a seperate grill compartment
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fatboyinlycra




Joined: 22 Oct 2004
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

my mum was a trained chef and she used to refer to what we call the grill (top down heat) as a Salamander and hot plate/element both sides was a grill.
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Badger
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Joined: 24 Aug 2005
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tritraveller wrote:
Badger wrote:

Broiling is top-down heat - UK grilling.
Grilling is cooking both sides, kinda like how a panini is heated. Whoppers are advertised as "flame-grilled" - so that's cooked over a flame on a rack. (?) Or it can mean barbequeing.
Steamed is steamed, as far as I know.


Right on the money. Most ovens come with a broiler. Mine has a grill fitted to the top of the oven, as well as conventional oven cooking you can put on the broiler, put a shelf near the top of the oven and put something on it that you want to be cooked and browned quickly. Lobster tails are a great example...

Ovens here(generally) don't have a seperate grill compartment

Spot on. The electric oven we had when I was a kid had elements on the top and bottom. The broiler setting meant the top element alone was on, so you put the food to be browned/crisped on the top oven rack.
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runtilyoudrop




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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am not sure I agree. I think the UK usage of the word is to cook with some liquid so that the meat or whatever is partially immersed and does not dry out. as for the american usage of the word, I dont think that matters too much Rolling Eyes as far as I can tell none of them outside of a few restaurants know the first thing about cooking! Current company accepted of course.
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rocks




Joined: 02 Sep 2004
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 11:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

broil


v. broiled, broil·ing, broils
v. tr.

To cook by direct radiant heat, as over a grill or under an electric element.

To expose to great heat.


v. intr.

To be exposed to great heat.


n.

The act of broiling or the condition of being broiled.

Food, especially meat, that is broiled.
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fatboyinlycra




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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

oxford english dictionary wrote:
broil

• verb chiefly N. Amer. 1 cook (meat or fish) by exposure to direct heat. 2 become very hot.

— ORIGIN Old French bruler ‘to burn’.



no term to mean cooking in water
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Badger
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 2:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

runtilyoudrop wrote:
I am not sure I agree. I think the UK usage of the word is to cook with some liquid so that the meat or whatever is partially immersed and does not dry out. as for the american usage of the word, I dont think that matters too much Rolling Eyes as far as I can tell none of them outside of a few restaurants know the first thing about cooking! Current company accepted of course.

I think that's "braised".

I could be wrong.
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