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Disc brake users - your verdict?
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ed_m




Joined: 15 May 2003
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Location: coventry

PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jorgan wrote:

As I've said before, in my experience (and that of many others) if you're using carbon rims, disc brakes are way better in the wet. I have carbon rims on both my 'best bikes' - but racing in the wet on my TT bike with rim brakes is pretty terrifying, and in races that happens 28.6% of the time Wink Laughing


ah but surely you're only braking 5.8% of the time ?
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Chrace




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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 1:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jorgan wrote:
Tubs or clinchers?

Tubeless.
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Jorgan




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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 1:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The great irony (which I've just remembered) is that the individual saying disc brakes are completely unnecessary, has wireless electronic shifting on their bike.
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mattsurf




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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 1:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chrace wrote:
Jorgan wrote:
Tubs or clinchers?

Tubeless.


Interested in this one too. Still like the feel of Tubulars on my TT bike, even though I know that clinchers are now just as fast. My road bike has Clinchers with latex tubes, and Vittoria Corsa G+ tyres, which are not available as tubeless tyres. However, my mountain bike is tubeless.

What is the advantage on the road over clinchers with Latex or Tubular?
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Chrace




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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 8:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Put the new bike to the test yesterday at the Struggle Moors sportive. Plenty of technical steep descends, including those fast straight lines slowly getting steeper and steeper up to 20-odd percent and ending sharply in a 90-degree bend at the bottom. Cue monster power braking.

For the first time ever I was far more worried about tyre grip than braking power. The discs definitely allow more stopping power, no doubt about it. And it was obviously completely dry.

I normally outrun most people on descends but yesterday more so than ever. on 3 occasions I had people trying to follow, good riders it looked like, but they overshot in to the verge at the turns. Guess they weren't good enough to know their own ability/bike but instead followed as if racing. No one hurt, they all caught me again shortly after (and then left me). But I have no doubt it was the braking power that was the difference.

Rest of the bike, less impressed. Lost left shifter after 20k and had to ride it all on the small ring. 9 gears left due to cross-chaining and it's a long day out. Also had innumerable amounts of rattling from all over at the end. Time to tighten up that "pre-assembled ready to ride" bike.
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Jorgan




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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 9:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We just need to start a thread asking users of electronic shifting (particularly eTap) on their opinions; and then those who don't have it, can rubbish the positive feedback of those that do.
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gingerbongo




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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jorgan wrote:
We just need to start a thread asking users of electronic shifting (particularly eTap) on their opinions; and then those who don't have it, can rubbish the positive feedback of those that do.


It's not even that hilly in the UK, so you don't even need gears.
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Chrace




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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

gingerbongo wrote:
Jorgan wrote:
We just need to start a thread asking users of electronic shifting (particularly eTap) on their opinions; and then those who don't have it, can rubbish the positive feedback of those that do.


It's not even that hilly in the UK, so you don't even need gears.

Only 8.3% of the time.

If there had been a bike shop nearby when my mechanical front shifter packed it in yesterday it could have been a very expensive day. Cables are sh!t.

I was not impressed, but I think my vocabulary was.
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Roscoemck




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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2018 7:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would say we're going to be limited for choice in a year or 2.

I was in Dales Cycles in Glasgow on Monday and the majority of road bikes on display had discs.

My experience with discs is only on a mountain bike. I'm not at all adept at anything mechanical, but can change rim brake pads (after some faffing).

The disc brakes totally defeated me! I also had issues remounting the wheel.

Things may be a lot simpler now, but at the moment, I would prefer to stay with rims.
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Jorgan




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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2018 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

^^ yes hydraulic disc can certainly can be a bit more technical; but most good modern systems are fairly maintenance-free, and pad float will adjust according to pad-wear (not so with cable disc). The main thing, is to remember not to pull the brake lever when a wheel is out - best thing is to put something between the pads when you have the wheel out for any prolonged period.

Where did Graham Farage go?
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Roscoemck




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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2018 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jorgan wrote:
^^ yes hydraulic disc can certainly can be a bit more technical; but most good modern systems are fairly maintenance-free, and pad float will adjust according to pad-wear (not so with cable disc). The main thing, is to remember not to pull the brake lever when a wheel is out - best thing is to put something between the pads when you have the wheel out for any prolonged period.

Where did Graham Farage go?


Really? What happens when you pull the lever?

This was all a few years ago, however, I distinctly recall pulling the lever when the wheel was out.
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Whisk




Joined: 09 Jun 2005
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2018 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roscoemck wrote:
Jorgan wrote:
^^ yes hydraulic disc can certainly can be a bit more technical; but most good modern systems are fairly maintenance-free, and pad float will adjust according to pad-wear (not so with cable disc). The main thing, is to remember not to pull the brake lever when a wheel is out - best thing is to put something between the pads when you have the wheel out for any prolonged period.

Where did Graham Farage go?


Really? What happens when you pull the lever?

This was all a few years ago, however, I distinctly recall pulling the lever when the wheel was out.


You run the risk that the pads won't separate again if there's nothing between them. You then have to force the pads apart and if you do this unevenly you run the risk of damaging the cylinders.

You're supposed to put spacers between the pads if you are travelling with the wheels out.
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Jorgan




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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2018 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roscoemck wrote:
Jorgan wrote:
^^ yes hydraulic disc can certainly can be a bit more technical; but most good modern systems are fairly maintenance-free, and pad float will adjust according to pad-wear (not so with cable disc). The main thing, is to remember not to pull the brake lever when a wheel is out - best thing is to put something between the pads when you have the wheel out for any prolonged period.

Where did Graham Farage go?


Really? What happens when you pull the lever?

This was all a few years ago, however, I distinctly recall pulling the lever when the wheel was out.


The pads close, but don't release. You just need to prize them apart again with a flat screwdriver, normally.
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Cobbie




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PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2018 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I bought lovely lightweight Canyon with traditional brakes 18 months ago and love it.

Then I bought a winter bike with disc brakes 6 months later and now wish I'd got disc brakes on the Canyon, apart from the fact that I'd have to bin my carbon clincher powertap.

There's no doubting the braking power but you do need to be careful about making other kit redundant
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Chrace




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PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2018 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Had a chat with the local Trek dealer the other day. They have been advised that for 2019/2020 they need to clear their stock of rim brakes since only low level kitted bikes (max 105) will be delivered with these going forwards. All new models will be discs. I think it's Cannondale they also do and had the same message from there. I predict some cheap rim brake bikes being dumped in September/October if you want one.

And as a follow up on my shifter problem, apparently it's one of those really rare manufacturing faults. Ratchet gone, shifter dead. Shimano warranty replacement. Nothing to do with the hydraulics mind you, just the cable ratchet. So... I've just ordered a Di2 groupset which will mean zero pull cables on my bike.
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