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Why are the roofs in swimming pools so high ?
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user134098




Joined: 29 Nov 2004
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

markie r wrote:
ell wrote:
So Water Polo can be played in it??


nope, or they wouldbn't have a shallow end.


You can play polo in a pool with a shallow end, and in many areas you have no choice. The only player who can stand in-play is the shallow-end goalie, if any of the outfield players use the bottom that's a foul. The shallow-end goalie can keep an eye on the goalie at the far end, and then shoot for goal if he's off his line or sleeping - that needs a high roof, but I doubt that architects are aware, or that the cost justifies the requirement.
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kemptonslim




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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ianmcl wrote:
markie r wrote:
ell wrote:
So Water Polo can be played in it??


nope, or they wouldbn't have a shallow end.


You can play polo in a pool with a shallow end, and in many areas you have no choice. The only player who can stand in-play is the shallow-end goalie, if any of the outfield players use the bottom that's a foul. The shallow-end goalie can keep an eye on the goalie at the far end, and then shoot for goal if he's off his line or sleeping - that needs a high roof, but I doubt that architects are aware, or that the cost justifies the requirement.


I think you need the high roof to fit the horses in.
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user134098




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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

and to swing the mallets

I'm with the lingo. Growing up, we never ever had any need to discuss the version with horses. (And tbh, that hasn't changed)
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Badger




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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 11:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd go with the need for ceiling support - I've been to only one pool with a low ceiling and that was in the basement of a Victorian building.

Growing up we were in a pool where the ceiling was high enough that the divers needed two or three bounces to touch, not just the usual hurdle step - so if there is that dimension I can understand it.
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Alan A




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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In Victorian times swimming pool roofs were high for purely structural reasons, the pleasing aesthetic effect and chemical dispertion benefits being a long lasting side effect.

The vast majority of 19thC UK public bath houses were constructed using cast or wrought iron in Neo Gothic or vernacular adaptation. The building materials used and the methodology applied meant that the vast majority of roofs were vaulted - very few flat roofs 130 years ago. Basic pythagoras theory means that the wider the pool the higher the apex of the roof.

The majority of public bath houses had not just one pool but two (male & female) similarly they also had hot baths / saunas tacked onto the side. All of these were heated from ruddy great big coal fired boilers. The benefit of the high ceilings meant increased volume of air and better ventilation.

Nowadays with concrete and steel we can easily span large areas with flat roofs thus reducing the height of the ceiling, however as mentioned earlier there are so many corrosive chemicals (water, chlorides etc) evaporating into the atmosphere at swimming pools that ventilation is a high priority - especially with open steel girders.

There are a few swimming pools with low ceilings, primarily in basement health clubs under major hotels. The structural elements of the walls & ceilings will be reinforced conrete. They are pokey horrible places.
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K.




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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 12:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For pools without grandstands and diving boards it's just all about spacial perception these days. Pools with lower ceilings feel more claustrophic and generally less pleasurable to swim in.

K.
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kemptonslim




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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 12:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Highbury Pool in London doesn't have a particularly high ceiling, but it's a rather utilitarian building of--probably--1950s vintage, if I had to guess. Maybe later. No diving there.
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Badger




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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 12:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't think the Victorians were worried about chlorine and the concomitant corrosion, either. When was chlorination first used en masse? The 1970s?
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WindyMiller




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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 12:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kemptonslim wrote:
Highbury Pool in London doesn't have a particularly high ceiling, but it's a rather utilitarian building of--probably--1950s vintage, if I had to guess. Maybe later. No diving there.


Nothing to do with the height of the ceiling but its also generally pretty filthy in there.
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Gus




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PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 11:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Nancy, that was awesome.
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Jorgan




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PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Laterz Nancy.
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Tri'ing Swimmer




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PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

An interesting thread to bump at least, particularly liked the giraffe theory.
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JeffB




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PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 9:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is a PITA at our pool and part of the reason it's so cold in there, and the fact they don't heat it!

As it's a two floor gym the pool has the same roof as the rest of the building but the roof is just sheet plastic\metal so at this time of the year there's a massive area to be heated, sometime the water can be pleasant but you stand up and get icicles on your ears Laughing

Sodding architects!

Jeff
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GrahamO




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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 4:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tri'ing Swimmer wrote:
An interesting thread to bump at least, particularly liked the giraffe theory.


She/It has gone - one shot disposable email in use.
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Gus




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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 10:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

GrahamO wrote:
Tri'ing Swimmer wrote:
An interesting thread to bump at least, particularly liked the giraffe theory.


She/It has gone - one shot disposable email in use.


Poor Nancy.

I was just getting to like her, as well.
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