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One dream bike or two bikes??
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Iain Gillam




Joined: 12 Jul 2010
Posts: 213
Location: Bonalba, Alicante, Spain

PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2015 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Duke_76 wrote:
To keep you all updated, as I know deep down your intrigued to what I do. I ran the two bike scenario past her in charge.

On the look alone I knew that it was not going to sit well, I made my plea. I felt it was well balanced in favour for two bikes - can you guess??? i'm going for one....got to keep them happy also.

Choices are:
Argon 18 Nitrogen 2016
Cervelo S3 and
Giant Propel Advanced Pro 0 2016.

All with Di2, all in the price range. Leader at the moment is the Giant - Its 500 quid cheaper and has a decent set of wheels. Both the Argon 18 and Cervelo would need a set of race wheels at some point.

Anyone any thoughts on the above bikes..


If you do want to swap road to TT set up it would be easier to get a bike with a normal front brake mount and di/ui2. That way you can get a set of TT bars with a front brake (tririg omega would be my pref for aero) and bar end shifters and a short stem. Then the swap would be unbolt stem and front brake, cut rear brake cable, unplug shifters, bolt new stem + bars + front brake then plug in shifters and pop in new rear brake cable. Look at the frame geometry closely as well, saddle position one to another isn't too much of an issue (I can ride the same saddle position road and TT) but you'll probably want shorter and lower for the TT bars. It's easier to raise your arms up on tt bars (go zipp vulka alumina or PDQ - but look on ebay as they are cheaper there) but difficult to drop it down so make sure the headtube isn't too big.

I'd err on the small side frame wise to get a low head tube and shorter top tube then you can stick a long stem on for road and a short for TT (better to go 140mm and 90mm than 100mm and 50mm for stem choice and handling.) Head tubes these days seem very tall and I normally have to size down and run no stack and even a -ve rise stem to get low enough for a road position. So I'd pay particular attention to the front end when looking at geo or you could end up more upright with TT bars than just using the road bars.

Iain
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Jorgan




Joined: 12 Nov 2007
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Location: alles was ich bin, alles was ich war

PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2015 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

G4V1N wrote:
Duke_76 wrote:
I'm not sure if I could justify having a seperate TT bike - if I'm honest I'd probably only use it 3/4 times a year. It doesn't make sense to me having 2 - 3 grands worth of kit sitting around only to be used a few times.


But you asked the question whether to have 1 bike or 2. Seems you've made your mind up.


Yeah, just opened this thread and got a few posts down, then.... Rolling Eyes

What the OP really needs is an aero road bike with a reversible seat post or saddle clamp, so he can easily change to a fwd position when he has aero bars on it; without messing about with the front end.
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hammerer




Joined: 19 Nov 2007
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Location: Right Next Door To Hell

PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2015 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As I now have a track bike and fixie for commute i sold my road bike and have just my PX stealth now for racing outdoors. As its external cable routing I have pre cabled road bars and brakes. I disconnect stem and just undo 4 cables, do up new stem (with bars already attached) and run the inners through the frame based outers and its done. It takes half hour to swap and that includes indexing the gears. As the stealth has a 75deg seat tube angle its mid way between proper TT and usual Road and also as i have adamo in TT mode it gets you further forward and creates a perfect angle! I use a normal saddle for road set up and bring it back on the rails. I basically get an aero road bike and TT bike that's Im not afraid to damage as the frame costs peanuts! also means i have a happy missus as i dont have 4 bikes in the garage (she dont get it Wink )

so think about a TT bike with slack angled seat tube! with Di2 its even easier to swap out!
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Duke_76




Joined: 26 Sep 2014
Posts: 13
Location: Hampshire

PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jorgan wrote:
G4V1N wrote:
Duke_76 wrote:
I'm not sure if I could justify having a seperate TT bike - if I'm honest I'd probably only use it 3/4 times a year. It doesn't make sense to me having 2 - 3 grands worth of kit sitting around only to be used a few times.


But you asked the question whether to have 1 bike or 2. Seems you've made your mind up.


Yeah, just opened this thread and got a few posts down, then.... Rolling Eyes

What the OP really needs is an aero road bike with a reversible seat post or saddle clamp, so he can easily change to a fwd position when he has aero bars on it; without messing about with the front end.


Bingo someone who has hit the nail on the head. All this swapping this swapping that, too much effort and I'm not the best at doing it anyway.
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jibberjim




Joined: 15 Aug 2008
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Duke_76 wrote:
Jorgan wrote:
What the OP really needs is an aero road bike with a reversible seat post or saddle clamp, so he can easily change to a fwd position when he has aero bars on it; without messing about with the front end.


Bingo someone who has hit the nail on the head. All this swapping this swapping that, too much effort and I'm not the best at doing it anyway.


Way too much effort, if you buy one bike, just commit to doing what the bike does well, compromises reduce your performance and endless tweaking around is a waste of time that could be spent training, or earning enough money so you can buy a 2nd bike (or a 2nd other half who doesn't mind you having more than 1 bike)
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Duke_76




Joined: 26 Sep 2014
Posts: 13
Location: Hampshire

PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2016 10:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thought I would make you all aware that I have got the new wheels and went for the Cervelo S3, mechanical ultegra and with the money save upgraded the wheels...

Only been on her twice since getting her home, jesus she feels quick - lack of legs permitting, light, comfortable etc. Looked at lots, tried lots it was the clear winner.

No more aggravating new bike posts from me, until next time.
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Muzza14




Joined: 05 Mar 2017
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 05, 2017 9:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was just wondering whether you ended up using the S3 for triathlons in the end? If so, what setup did you use?
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mattsurf




Joined: 28 Sep 2016
Posts: 101
Location: salisbury

PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 9:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a road bike, a CX bike and a TT bike. I could survive very happily with my TT bike and CX bike.

Only had the CX bike 6 weeks and it cost me 925 new, it is a GT Grade X. With a set of 35mm road tyres I am happy at 20mph on club rides and can keep up with the faster group of riders. I can ride it during the winter on crap roads, which are full of pot holes. It is really comfortable compared with my road bike and I love the disc brakes. However, what I like most is the ability to go off road - a good set of CX tyres and this bike is simply amazing off road, I can take my kids out along the coastal path or through the new forest. It is setup with a single ring 44 tooth chainset and 11-36 cassette, which is enough for getting up most off road climbs, but also high enough not to spin out until 42mph. Finally during those winter months, I can do some CX competitions - only managed one this year as I got my bike at the end of the season

TT bike is for Time Trials, Triathlons and fast training rides on good roads during the summer. I love the TT bike (Shiv - 1200 on ebay, 400 for 88/66 Reynolds assault wheels on ebay, 500 for Quarq power meter on ebay, 600 for DI2 6780 with TT and brake shifters on ebay), my other hobby is building bikes so generally know what I am doing on ebay. A good TT bike will always be faster than any road bike on a TT or most Triathlons.... even if it is not faster, will give you the psycological benefit of being on the right bike.

This leaves me with the road bike - I have a 2013 Orbea Orca Gold with DI2, Stages Power meter and Reynolds Assault 46mm carbon wheels. This bike is my "luxury" - will be used on club rides now that weather is improving and getting lighter in the evenings, it will also be used for Sportives. I love how this bike looks and feels, it makes you feel special every time you ride it, but it lacks the versatility and disc brakes of the CX bike and it lacks the out rate pace of the TT bike
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The_Exile




Joined: 15 Aug 2013
Posts: 841
Location: The flat lands out East

PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mattsurf wrote:
I have a road bike, a CX bike and a TT bike. I could survive very happily with my TT bike and CX bike.

Only had the CX bike 6 weeks and it cost me 925 new, it is a GT Grade X. With a set of 35mm road tyres I am happy at 20mph on club rides and can keep up with the faster group of riders. I can ride it during the winter on crap roads, which are full of pot holes. It is really comfortable compared with my road bike and I love the disc brakes. However, what I like most is the ability to go off road - a good set of CX tyres and this bike is simply amazing off road, I can take my kids out along the coastal path or through the new forest. It is setup with a single ring 44 tooth chainset and 11-36 cassette, which is enough for getting up most off road climbs, but also high enough not to spin out until 42mph. Finally during those winter months, I can do some CX competitions - only managed one this year as I got my bike at the end of the season

TT bike is for Time Trials, Triathlons and fast training rides on good roads during the summer. I love the TT bike (Shiv - 1200 on ebay, 400 for 88/66 Reynolds assault wheels on ebay, 500 for Quarq power meter on ebay, 600 for DI2 6780 with TT and brake shifters on ebay), my other hobby is building bikes so generally know what I am doing on ebay. A good TT bike will always be faster than any road bike on a TT or most Triathlons.... even if it is not faster, will give you the psycological benefit of being on the right bike.

This leaves me with the road bike - I have a 2013 Orbea Orca Gold with DI2, Stages Power meter and Reynolds Assault 46mm carbon wheels. This bike is my "luxury" - will be used on club rides now that weather is improving and getting lighter in the evenings, it will also be used for Sportives. I love how this bike looks and feels, it makes you feel special every time you ride it, but it lacks the versatility and disc brakes of the CX bike and it lacks the out rate pace of the TT bike


I am currently considering selling my older road bike which is now my winter bike and getting a CX bike with a spare set of wheels and using it with road tyres as a winter bike and also for a bit of off roading on tracks etc when the roads are too icy.

If I was looking at a high spec bike for both road and TT I would look at fitting it out with SRAM eTap which would make swapping everything over much easier.
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Jorgan




Joined: 12 Nov 2007
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 9:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I've long said my TT bike and a nice Carbon or Ti Gravel bike would be enough for me. It would half what I currently have lying about.
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explorerJC




Joined: 20 Oct 2005
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 10:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Duke_76 wrote:
I take on board what everyone is advising me. I'm not sure if I could justify having a seperate TT bike - if I'm honest I'd probably only use it 3/4 times a year. It doesn't make sense to me having 2 - 3 grands worth of kit sitting around only to be used a few times.

.


why would you only use it 3 or 4 times a year?
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jibberjim




Joined: 15 Aug 2008
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Location: Kingston

PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 10:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

explorerJC wrote:
Duke_76 wrote:
I take on board what everyone is advising me. I'm not sure if I could justify having a seperate TT bike - if I'm honest I'd probably only use it 3/4 times a year. It doesn't make sense to me having 2 - 3 grands worth of kit sitting around only to be used a few times.

.


why would you only use it 3 or 4 times a year?


I think I've used my TT bike about twice a year on average... so I agree seems excessive
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explorerJC




Joined: 20 Oct 2005
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jibberjim wrote:
explorerJC wrote:
Duke_76 wrote:
I take on board what everyone is advising me. I'm not sure if I could justify having a seperate TT bike - if I'm honest I'd probably only use it 3/4 times a year. It doesn't make sense to me having 2 - 3 grands worth of kit sitting around only to be used a few times.

.


why would you only use it 3 or 4 times a year?


I think I've used my TT bike about twice a year on average... so I agree seems excessive


in a competitive year, i may use mine 100+ times
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Jorgan




Joined: 12 Nov 2007
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It depends on what your goals are. If' you're doing a longer triathlon in the summer, then it makes sense to train regularly on the bike you're racing on. If that's a TT bike, then (like me) you should be riding it outside minimum once a week from the Spring onwards, or at least very regularly on the trainer. I use my TT bike almost exclusively from mid-March until my A Race.

If you keep a TT bike for the odd Sprint or Oly and prefer riding a road bike - it might not be the best way to have your money invested.
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mattsurf




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PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 3:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with Jorgen, my TT bike will be my most frequently used bike from now, I will probably use my road bike for club rides, as the TT bike is anti-social and pretentious, and will use my CX bike for summer rides with kids.

Why would you only use TT bike 2-3 times a year?
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