Tri Talk HomepageTri Talk EventsTri Talk ForumsBlogsTri Talk TrainingTri TradeTriPlayerWikiTeam Tri Talk
Education in Scotland
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    TriTalk.co.uk Forum Index -> Off-Topic
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Alexander222




Joined: 05 Jan 2017
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 10:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think today education is too widescale and life is running faster so kids are simply not able to get deep knowledge on the suff they study. They have crumbs of what they might learn.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
explorerJC




Joined: 20 Oct 2005
Posts: 14341
Location: Farthingstone

PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

life is no faster....it's just been filled with carp..

educators tend to live on the left pole so it is hardly surprising that society is losing its way...
_________________
www.appliedtri.co.uk Tri and Du coaching

www.naturalrunningform.co.uk Natural Running Form Coach

2017 Training Camps http://www.appliedtri.co.uk/training-camps/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Jorgan




Joined: 12 Nov 2007
Posts: 16101
Location: alles was ich bin, alles was ich war

PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gus wrote:

Just been to my daughter's nursery Xmas party. It's standard practice now that pass-the-parcel has a little 'present' in each layer, so no-one's left out. No more musical chairs, because we can't have only one winner.

Our complacent society is breeding out competitive culture, we see it in every corner of our lives now, and I lay the blame squarely on the liberal/left. It's great if everyone on this planet played by the same rules but they don't.


Snowflakes?

My son (also a Gus) is going on 3, and generally he thinks everything is his. If he wants something, he takes it; Xmas gifts of his older sister have also been claimed. I laughingly refer to him as a 'Medieval Lord'...what he sees, is his. We have continued to reinforce this naturally, by getting him a fort, foam swords, toy soldiers, cannons etc. I might get him some Roman stuff when he's a bit older. Apparently, when another child was told to kiss him better, he held his hand out to the child. With the world going to hell in a handcart, it's probably prudent to raise our son as a Conqueror in waiting.

I await the day he tells me.. "father, from now on you shall address me as 'My Liege"

Where were we?
_________________
25 Years since it all began....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SloggingScotsman




Joined: 18 Jul 2006
Posts: 2462

PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

explorerJC wrote:
life is no faster....it's just been filled with carp..

educators tend to live on the left pole so it is hardly surprising that society is losing its way...
society is loosing its way because politicians have been playing politics for far too long, and not actually combining wisdom with broad experience, while perhaps not recognising that they serve the whole nation.

MPs work very hard, but appear to me to have lost the plot over what really matters. Which to be fair is not entirely their fault given how parties operate internally.

We desperately need a new type of widely life experienced truth seekers who consider fairly all perspectives, politician in Britain, but our structures simply are not set up to enable that.

Back to education, all that I know is that my own education has served me very well, and it was a tough place for me to be. Nowadays sadly bums on seats for money seems to be more important than academic standards. Very sad.

When Coutts give me my half trillion pounds I will sort the buggers out.

Anyone who reads the Economist this weeks briefing on Teresa May and in there re Cameron and Osborne, Brown and Blair, is quite illuminating.
_________________
Vote Stewart for Secretary General of the UN Smile
Good Judgement Project Brier Score 0.142 (median 0.367) https://www.gjopen.com/
Read: Our Place in the Twenty First Century
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Gus




Joined: 07 Sep 2007
Posts: 2249
Location: Freezing my nads off in Aberdoom

PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 2:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jorgan wrote:
Gus wrote:

Just been to my daughter's nursery Xmas party. It's standard practice now that pass-the-parcel has a little 'present' in each layer, so no-one's left out. No more musical chairs, because we can't have only one winner.

Our complacent society is breeding out competitive culture, we see it in every corner of our lives now, and I lay the blame squarely on the liberal/left. It's great if everyone on this planet played by the same rules but they don't.


Snowflakes?

My son (also a Gus) is going on 3, and generally he thinks everything is his. If he wants something, he takes it; Xmas gifts of his older sister have also been claimed. I laughingly refer to him as a 'Medieval Lord'...what he sees, is his. We have continued to reinforce this naturally, by getting him a fort, foam swords, toy soldiers, cannons etc. I might get him some Roman stuff when he's a bit older. Apparently, when another child was told to kiss him better, he held his hand out to the child. With the world going to hell in a handcart, it's probably prudent to raise our son as a Conqueror in waiting.

I await the day he tells me.. "father, from now on you shall address me as 'My Liege"

Where were we?


This upcoming generation absolutely do have an inherent sense of entitlement bred into them. I'm not sure where it stems from - school, society, TV, parents' indulgence... maybe a combination of all the above...

My wife used to be a careers guidance counsellor at one of the top Universities in the UK. Every day she would get very intelligent, well educated students through basically demanding they wanted a good job paying 50k immediately with significant responsibilities, with a 'good work/life balance' (ie I won't work more than 8hrs a day). They wanted it all and straightaway, and were not prepared to work hard for it.

So she had to spend most of her time deflating their expectations and trying to translate their demands into the real world. In other words, they had spent their entire childhood being built up with the expectation that the world was their's, that they could be anything they want to be etc etc... all these lovely, positive aspirations that are drummed into them from nursery that last as guiding beacons in their heads right up to the point where they slam face-first into the brick wall of the real world.

It's our fault - our generation has really built up the next generation for a big fall and we should bear some guilt for that. It is our responsibility to prepare our children to survive and prosper in the real world and collectively (in the West mainly) I think we are failing badly in this.

Incidentally, the really successful ones my wife helped, were the Chinese. In China, their more brutal and less molly-coddling nurturing of their children is producing a generation that are better prepared and educated - and they are taking the best jobs, achieving the most success in business, technology etc.. Ok, their system may not be ideal but the world is competitive, whether we like it or not, and they are beating us hands down.

They own the future; we have been the architects of our own downfall.

Incidentally she also said the Germans, particularly, were noticeably better educated than our own natives, with more realistic expectations.
_________________
BLOG now updating again!
In a world where I feel so small, I can't stop thinking big...

My 15 minutes of fame
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
hammerer




Joined: 19 Nov 2007
Posts: 16248
Location: Right Next Door To Hell

PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 2:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We have none of these issues in the private schools of the south east. When will you peasants learn it's our way of keeping you serfs where you belong.
_________________
Blog
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
TransitionTed




Joined: 02 Aug 2008
Posts: 21430
Location: On It Lika A Car Bonnet

PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gus wrote:

Incidentally, the really successful ones my wife helped, were the Chinese. In China, their more brutal and less molly-coddling nurturing of their children is producing a generation that are better prepared and educated - and they are taking the best jobs, achieving the most success in business, technology etc.. Ok, their system may not be ideal but the world is competitive, whether we like it or not, and they are beating us hands down.

.

I appreciate that point about being molly-coddled. However, I think there's a difference between molly coddling and being an inspirational parent who instil aspirational values in their children. It's a question of focus, firstly by the parent/guardian, and then by the child
I know many people who have had really financially privileged upbringings, gone to good schools, gained good degrees and are now employed in good careers with well defined and prestigious pathways. They may not be industry leaders, but they are certainly enriching the country's economy.
On the other hand I know people who have come from really hard upbringings financially and have gained equally good status in their chosen careers.
The things these two groups of people had was consistent focus and guidance from parents or guardians

My point is that, regardless of background, if your parents are able to someway focus you in your early years, and this can come in many different forms over many years, then I feel that child is more able to focus themselves.

I see and hear about the disengagement of parents from their children's futures, for a host of reasons, and it saddens me.
_________________
Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Gus




Joined: 07 Sep 2007
Posts: 2249
Location: Freezing my nads off in Aberdoom

PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 4:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TransitionTed wrote:

My point is that, regardless of background, if your parents are able to someway focus you in your early years, and this can come in many different forms over many years, then I feel that child is more able to focus themselves.

I see and hear about the disengagement of parents from their children's futures, for a host of reasons, and it saddens me.


Totally agree with this. I think good parenting (generally) trumps anything else. Defining what counts as good parenting is difficult, though - defining what is bad parenting is probably a lot easier. I have enough anecdotal evidence of how predictably well, or badly, people have turned out as a result of these two very different paths.

However, always exceptions to the rule (eg I know a drug-addict mess from the most perfect, loving, supportive family and private-school background... why?). But it's clear to me, good parental focus and attention during the earlier years does reap rewards for that child.

What I have also summised, though, is there is no definitive right way to do anything with a baby/toddler/child. If there was, then after several trillion births in the history of mankind, we would've discovered the one single 'right' way by now. As we haven't, then obviously the one-size-fits-all solution doesn't exist. Every child is different and actually in most (not all, but most) cases it is only the parents themselves who are best placed to work out what is best for their child.
_________________
BLOG now updating again!
In a world where I feel so small, I can't stop thinking big...

My 15 minutes of fame
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
TransitionTed




Joined: 02 Aug 2008
Posts: 21430
Location: On It Lika A Car Bonnet

PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gus wrote:
TransitionTed wrote:

My point is that, regardless of background, if your parents are able to someway focus you in your early years, and this can come in many different forms over many years, then I feel that child is more able to focus themselves.

I see and hear about the disengagement of parents from their children's futures, for a host of reasons, and it saddens me.


Totally agree with this. I think good parenting (generally) trumps anything else. Defining what counts as good parenting is difficult, though - defining what is bad parenting is probably a lot easier. I have enough anecdotal evidence of how predictably well, or badly, people have turned out as a result of these two very different paths.

However, always exceptions to the rule (eg I know a drug-addict mess from the most perfect, loving, supportive family and private-school background... why?). But it's clear to me, good parental focus and attention during the earlier years does reap rewards for that child.

What I have also summised, though, is there is no definitive right way to do anything with a baby/toddler/child. If there was, then after several trillion births in the history of mankind, we would've discovered the one single 'right' way by now. As we haven't, then obviously the one-size-fits-all solution doesn't exist. Every child is different and actually in most (not all, but most) cases it is only the parents themselves who are best placed to work out what is best for their child.


I'm no parent, gus, that's for damn sure but I'm certain it's a big ask to guide a child through puberty without any real problems. I think education these days, and I'm talking about your common or garden variety of comprehensive, tends to treat learners like widgets on an assembly line. Of course, they're not but the pressure on the education system is, in turn, exerting that evolutionary pressure onto pupils.
_________________
Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Gus




Joined: 07 Sep 2007
Posts: 2249
Location: Freezing my nads off in Aberdoom

PostPosted: Sat Jan 07, 2017 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh. Puberty.

All bets are off for that time.... nothing, but nothing works, the laws of physics and logic do not apply.

My wife and I have spent hours discussing the best approach to take for our 3 as it approaches... and all we've concluded is just pray they all come out the other side at least relatively 'normal'.
_________________
BLOG now updating again!
In a world where I feel so small, I can't stop thinking big...

My 15 minutes of fame
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SloggingScotsman




Joined: 18 Jul 2006
Posts: 2462

PostPosted: Sat Jan 07, 2017 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gus wrote:
Oh. Puberty.

All bets are off for that time.... nothing, but nothing works, the laws of physics and logic do not apply.

My wife and I have spent hours discussing the best approach to take for our 3 as it approaches... and all we've concluded is just pray they all come out the other side at least relatively 'normal'.
they will be fine Gus.

As I care for my wife I have been fortunate to have largely brought my kids up, and due to her illnesses and disabilities it has been tough on all of us. Anyhow up until puberty I had a great time, doing all the sorts of things I didn't have a child (broken home). Move onto puberty ah eeek, that was really tough and I felt a bit lost. That said I still went with them swimming, karate, air cadets, walks and bike rides etc, with very occasional meals out when funds permit. Mind you the Chartered Accountants Benevolent Association helped me immensely for which I am very grateful. But it was tough, mind you my wife was long term ill, I was getting stressed by mum (who wanted me back home in Scotland), wife (ill) daughter (puberty) simultaneously for years.

Anyhow not only did we survive, my son worked his way up from apprentice print finisher to being a factory supervisor obviously in charge of half a dozen staff. His social skills are phenomenal and really put me to shame. My daughter is finishing her Criminology degree this year, and while she is worried about her future career at the moment, she has managed to combine working part time successfully with university. I am so proud of them both. She now feels bad for the stress that she put me under during her puberty years, which I obviously tell her not to worry about, for it is all part of life experience.

My point Gus, don't worry it will be ok.
_________________
Vote Stewart for Secretary General of the UN Smile
Good Judgement Project Brier Score 0.142 (median 0.367) https://www.gjopen.com/
Read: Our Place in the Twenty First Century
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Gus




Joined: 07 Sep 2007
Posts: 2249
Location: Freezing my nads off in Aberdoom

PostPosted: Sat Jan 07, 2017 4:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Sloggers... hopefully we will navigate the minefield reasonably well as it arrives.

I remember being the kid from hell as a teenager.. my poor parents...
_________________
BLOG now updating again!
In a world where I feel so small, I can't stop thinking big...

My 15 minutes of fame
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
TransitionTed




Joined: 02 Aug 2008
Posts: 21430
Location: On It Lika A Car Bonnet

PostPosted: Sat Jan 07, 2017 6:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gus wrote:
Thanks Sloggers... hopefully we will navigate the minefield reasonably well as it arrives.

I remember being the kid from hell as a teenager.. my poor parents...

All I wanted to do from yrs 12-17 was fight and play rugby. I was a PITA and constantly causing trouble and picking fights with people who could kick my head in.
How me and my dad didn't kill each other, I'll never know
_________________
Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
explorerJC




Joined: 20 Oct 2005
Posts: 14341
Location: Farthingstone

PostPosted: Sat Jan 07, 2017 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gus wrote:


I remember being the kid from hell as a teenager.. my poor parents...


yep, my father died when i was young and boy was I difficult afterwards....
_________________
www.appliedtri.co.uk Tri and Du coaching

www.naturalrunningform.co.uk Natural Running Form Coach

2017 Training Camps http://www.appliedtri.co.uk/training-camps/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
explorerJC




Joined: 20 Oct 2005
Posts: 14341
Location: Farthingstone

PostPosted: Sat Jan 07, 2017 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TransitionTed wrote:
I was a PITA and constantly causing trouble and picking fights with people who could kick my head in.


stood you in good stead on here then Smile
_________________
www.appliedtri.co.uk Tri and Du coaching

www.naturalrunningform.co.uk Natural Running Form Coach

2017 Training Camps http://www.appliedtri.co.uk/training-camps/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    TriTalk.co.uk Forum Index -> Off-Topic All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Page 2 of 3
  Share
 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum





Home | About TT | Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions | Advertising | Contact TT
Copyright ©2003-2015 TriTalk®.co.uk. All rights reserved.